More Best Practices Online for Job Seekers

Welcome to the second of my two-part series of commentaries and tips on using the Internet to get a new job.

Seeing & Being Seen

One absolutely essential factor in whether or not you use the Internet successfully to get a new job is seeing others online who are seeking new jobs and being seen online by those who are hiring people for new jobs. This may seem obvious, but it is possible to fall into the trap of thinking that all one needs to do is post a resume somewhere online and the hiring managers will beat a path to your door. If you are someone who believes that you’re all set with your online search for a new job because you posted your resume online, you are kidding yourself. This I promise you.

Networking

Not so long ago, it was possible to get a new job by searching through print newspapers in the classified ads section. In the past we didn’t have to specify print newspapers because those were the only kind.

I got a new job in Arizona 20 years ago by searching through the print version of the Arizona Republic in their classified ads section. Twenty years ago things were very different from today when it came to finding a new job. What worked then likely won’t work now.

Here’s what my experience was two decades ago: I saw a job posting for a job in Arizona that was posted by an Arizona cable television company in that famous Phoenix newspaper. I sent in a hard-copy cover letter and resume through the US Postal Service. I received a phone call from the hiring manager. I was interviewed. Then, I was offered the job.

Whether any of us workers who are over the age of 40 today want to believe it or not, that particular process of using a print newspaper and sending a cover letter/resume through snail mail (a.k.a. the US Postal Service) is outmoded in 2012. Don’t use this method if you want to succeed in getting a new job today.

What has replaced that outmoded method is networking–both in person and in the virtual realm online. Keep in mind that networking today means having meaningful interaction with other human beings. Networking is a two-way street that involves ongoing contact with other people.

Best Practice for Online Networking

I previously mentioned LinkedIn as one essential online venue where all serious job seekers today need to be. The powerful “secret” about LinkedIn that I will share with you is this: On LinkedIn you can sign up for groups that match your professional interests and your career goals. By looking at the job postings within these LinkedIn groups, you can make a highly pinpointed search for a new job.

I have one specific recommendation for all who are age 40 and over who are seeking a new job: Join the Work Reimagined group on LinkedIn and become a regular participant. Why? This particular LinkedIn group is operated by AARP, which is one strong player in advocating for the advancement of older workers.

I want to let you know that AARP was a former employer of mine up through 2006. I receive no financial or other consideration from AARP for mentioning them or their Work Reimagined efforts.

The justification for you to get involved in this (or any other LinkedIn) group is for you to have a highly credible place to have meaningful interaction with others who, like you, are seeking a new job. By participating in LinkedIn groups, you will increase your exposure to hiring managers who use LinkedIn to identify candidates to fill openings for new employees. If you are not already on LinkedIn, you need to sign up today.

In my next blog post, I will cover what it is that you can do for others in your career that makes you unique compared to every other person. I will show you how to put this specific awareness to work so you can create or fix your personal brand for optimum results.

  #1: personal brand first how to
  #2: personal brand verbal communication
  #3: writing well personal brand
  #4: character and personal brand
  #5: personal brand uniqueness
  #6: job seekers best practices online
  #7: more best practices online job seekers
  #8: personal brand your unique outcomes
  #9: personal brand the journey
#10: should I stay or should I go?
#11: networking in Las Vegas
#12: surviving a career transition
#13: scoffing dinosaur
#14: managing your online reputation
#15: choosing who you are
#16: so you think you can retire
#17: your own place in the future

Job Seekers Best Practices Online

Knowledge is the first thing that will separate you from all other job seekers who are using the Internet. Knowledge will help you stand out from the crowd. When it comes to genuine and true awareness of how to use the Internet for job searching, there is 100% validity in the old adage, knowledge is power. Let me share this power with you to help you create or fix your personal brand while seeking new employment.

Where to Start Online

The essential first stop online for all job seekers with professional experience should be LinkedIn. There you need to fill out an online profile and showcase your uniqueness. There you spell out clearly and succinctly what you do professionally.

Registration online at LinkedIn takes only a couple of minutes.

LinkedIn

You can choose the free version. But, I recommend that you upgrade to the premium job seeker version because doing so will help you stand out from the crowd on LinkedIn. You get what you pay for. Free is fine. Just don’t expect the best possible experience on LinkedIn if you opt for the free version.

Ignore everyone who claims that LinkedIn is not necessary for a job seeker with professional experience. Those who dismiss or diminish LinkedIn are not to be taken seriously. This one online service is essential for any job seeker with professional experience.

Personalized Coaching and Training

If you would like personalized help in setting up your LinkedIn presence, please contact me.

I will help you with personalized assistance. I will share my experience and lessons learned using LinkedIn as a job seeker with professional experience with you in a one-to-one coaching relationship specifically to help you advance your job search.

This is a very low price that will give you great value: You will gain access to knowledge, and that knowledge will empower you in your job search. Plus, you won’t have to spend hundreds and hundreds of dollars like I did to gain this knowledge.

You still will have to seek your own job, however. I do not provide that service because I believe there is no substitute for one finding their own job through their own efforts.

But, I am skilled at coaching and training professionals. I have many lessons learned that I bought and paid for our of my own pocket. I will share this with you in a personalized and targeted way at a very low one-time price.

Online Networking

I also recommend Ned’s Job of the Week as an online place to network with others. This is a free service. Connecting with others through Ned Lundquist’s website will put you into a valuable group of over 11,000 people!

What to Avoid Online

My experience has taught me to avoid the online job boards such as Monster that require you to pay a fee for access. There are so many job boards online today. Those that ask for you to pay for access are there to make money for the owners and not necessarily to help you find a job. Don’t spend your money on job boards.

Only pay for LinkedIn, which has all the published job listings that you will need.

I also recommend that if you are professional with years of experience you should not pay anyone to help you get a hired. Such services can cost you several thousand dollars and a percentage of your new salary. Unless there is an iron-clad guarantee that such a significant financial investment will be fully refunded to you if you do not actually land a job using this service, you should just avoid these services completely.

Preying Upon Your Emotions

If you are a professional and you are over the age of 30, a job search is an emotionally taxing experience. Let me be honest with you: Unfortunately, there is no way to avoid this reality of an emotionally taxing experience. Many who sell their services online will prey upon your emotions during this highly vulnerable time for you. I hope you can steer clear of anyone who preys upon your emotions online while you are seeking new employment. You will not feel better if you spend money with someone who is only out to make a buck and not necessarily to help you find a job. You will feel worse. I promise you that.

Facebook

If Facebook launches their own online service for job seekers, you should take a look at that. This is only rumored as of late July. But, do to the sheer number of Facebook users, I recommend that you at least take a look at any Facebook job seeker service if one is launched.

In my next blog post, I will cover part two of online job search best practices to help you create or fix the best possible personal brand for yourself.

  #1: personal brand first how to
  #2: personal brand verbal communication
  #3: writing well personal brand
  #4: character and personal brand
  #5: personal brand uniqueness
  #6: job seekers best practices online
  #7: more best practices online job seekers
  #8: personal brand your unique outcomes
  #9: personal brand the journey
#10: should I stay or should I go?
#11: networking in Las Vegas
#12: surviving a career transition
#13: scoffing dinosaur
#14: managing your online reputation
#15: choosing who you are
#16: so you think you can retire
#17: your own place in the future